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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2019-5
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2019-5
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Short communication 25 Apr 2019

Short communication | 25 Apr 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal SOIL (SOIL).

Base cations in the soil bank. Non-exchangeable pools may sustain centuries of net loss to forestry and leaching

Nicholas P. Rosenstock1, Johan Stendahl2, Gregory van der Heijden3, Lars Lundin4, Eric McGivney5, Kevin Bishop4, and Stefan Löfgren4 Nicholas P. Rosenstock et al.
  • 1Center for Environmental and Climate Research, Lund University, Lund, 232 62, Sweden
  • 2Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7014, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
  • 3INRA UR 1138, Biogéochimie des Ecosystèmes Forestiers, FR-54280 Champenoux, France
  • 4Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7050, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
  • 5Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (ACES), Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden

Abstract. The soil exchangeable pool is classically viewed as the bank of base cations in the soil, withdrawn from by plant uptake and leaching and deposited into by decomposition, deposition and mineral weathering. While largely true, this view ignores the potential large size of other soil nutrient pools, including microbial biomass, clay interlayer absorbed elements, and calcium oxalate. These pools can be sizeable and neglecting them in studies examining the sustainability of biomass extractions or need for nutient return limits our ability to gauge the threat or risk of unusustainable biomass removals. In this short communication, we examine a set of chemical extraction data from a mature Norway Spruce forest in central Sweden, and compare this dataset to ecosystem flux data gathered from the site in other research. We bound the sizes of these pools and discuss them in the perspective of a forest rotation period. Lastly, we highlight the potential for sequential extraction techniques and isotope exchange measurments to illuminate the identify and flux rates of these important, and commonly overlooked, nutrient pools.

Nicholas P. Rosenstock et al.
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Short summary
Biofuel harvests from forests involve large removals of available nutrients, necessitating accurate measurements of soil nutrient stocks. We found that dilute hydrochloric acid extractions from soils released far more Ca, Na and K than classical salt-extracted exchangeable nutrient pools. The size of these acid-extractable pools may indicate that forest ecosystems could sustain greater biomass extractions of Ca, Mg, and K, than are predicted from salt-extracted exchangeable base cation pools.
Biofuel harvests from forests involve large removals of available nutrients, necessitating...
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