Journal cover Journal topic
SOIL An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • CiteScore value: 7.57 CiteScore 7.57
  • SNIP value: 2.708 SNIP 2.708
  • SJR value: 2.150 SJR 2.150
  • IPP value: 7.02 IPP 7.02
  • Scimago H index value: 17 Scimago H index 17
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2018-27
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2018-27
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Short communication 01 Nov 2018

Short communication | 01 Nov 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal SOIL (SOIL).

Soil lacquer peel DIY: simply capturing beauty

Cathelijne R. Stoof, Jasper H. J. Candel, Laszlo van der Wal, and Gert Peek Cathelijne R. Stoof et al.
  • Soil Geography and Landscape Group, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands

Abstract. Visualization can greatly benefit understanding of concepts and processes, which in soil science and geology can be done using real life snapshots of soils and sediments in lacquer peels and glue peels. While it may seem complicated, anyone can make such a soil peel for use in classrooms, public places, homes and offices for teaching, outreach, decoration and awareness. Technological development has considerably simplified the making of soil peels, but this methodological innovation has not been described in the literature. Here, we report on a thoroughly tested and simple method for taking peels of sandy soils using readily available tools and materials. Our method follows the main previously published steps of preparing a soil face, impregnating the soil face with a fixation agent in the field, extracting the resulting peel and mounting it on a wooden panel. Yet instead of using lacquers and thinning agents, we use strong though flexible contact adhesive (glue), which has the major advantage that it no longer requires use and mixing of toxic chemicals in the field or reinforcement of the peel to prevent breaking. Moreover, the preservation potential is much higher than with the old method. This new twist to old methods makes creating of soil peels more safe, simple and successful, and a thereby true DIY (do it yourself) activity. The resulting increased accessibility of making soil and sediment peels can benefit research, teaching, and science communication and can thereby bring the value and beauty of the ground below our feet to students, schools, policy makers, and the general public.

Cathelijne R. Stoof et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 12 Jan 2019)
Status: open (until 12 Jan 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Cathelijne R. Stoof et al.
Cathelijne R. Stoof et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 544 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
410 128 6 544 168 3 3
  • HTML: 410
  • PDF: 128
  • XML: 6
  • Total: 544
  • Supplement: 168
  • BibTeX: 3
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 01 Nov 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 01 Nov 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 542 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 537 with geography defined and 5 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 10 Dec 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Teaching and outreach of soils is often done with real life snapshots of soils and sediments in lacquer or glue peels. While it may seem hard, anyone can make such a peel. Illustrated with handmade drawings and instructional video, we explain how to capture soils in peels using readily available materials. A new twist to old methods makes this more safe, simple and successful, and thus a true DIY (do it yourself) activity, highlighting the value and beauty of the ground below our feet.
Teaching and outreach of soils is often done with real life snapshots of soils and sediments in...
Citation
Share