Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • CiteScore value: 7.57 CiteScore 7.57
  • SNIP value: 2.708 SNIP 2.708
  • SJR value: 2.150 SJR 2.150
  • IPP value: 7.02 IPP 7.02
  • Scimago H index value: 17 Scimago H index 17
Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2018-24
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Original research article 06 Aug 2018

Original research article | 06 Aug 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal SOIL (SOIL).

Soil nutrient content in relation to women's agricultural knowledge in the urban gardens of Kisumu, Kenya

Nicolette Tamara R. J. M. Jonkman1, Esmee D. Kooijman1, Boris Jansen1, Nicky R. M. Pouw2, and Karsten Kalbitz3 Nicolette Tamara R. J. M. Jonkman et al.
  • 1Ecosystem and Landscape Dynamics group, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 1090 GE, the Netherlands
  • 2Governance and Inclusive Development Programme Group, Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 1018 WS, the Netherlands
  • 3Soil Resources and Land Use group, Institute of Soil Science and Site Ecology, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden, 01062, Germany

Abstract. Agricultural production in Kenya has been declining since the 1980s, either because soils are mismanaged or because they lack nutrients. In Kisumu, just under 50% of the workers in the urban gardens are female. On average, women spend more hours a day in the gardens than men. To increase yields, women’s knowledge has to be considered in agricultural management. However, women face greater obstacles in land ownership, investment, and farm inputs due to social and cultural constraints as consequence of their gender. This case study aimed to determine the nutrient content in soils of the urban gardens of Kisumu, the agricultural knowledge of the women farmers and how their knowledge influences soil nutrient content through their management.

Soils were sampled in Nyalenda, one of Kisumu's informal settlements where urban gardening is practised, to determine soil nutrient content. To determine how agricultural management practices influences total C and N, available N and P, and exchangeable K, Mg and Ca in the soil, two prevailing practices were compared: (1) applying manure only, and: (2) applying manure while intercropping with cowpeas. Interviews and focus group discussions were organised to determine what knowledge the female vegetable farmers possess, and where they acquired their knowledge.

Soil analysis showed that agricultural management had significant effects on nutrient presence and availability. Intercropping led to significantly lower total soil nutrient contents than when only manure was applied. However, due to socio-economic factors, such as poverty, intercropping was applied in a way that did not increase soil nutrients but diversified revenue. The knowledge of the female vegetable growers was found to be limited to practical and sensory knowledge. This shows that in addition to socio-economic and cultural context, gendered knowledge differentiation has to be acknowledged and used in agricultural training when aiming to improve soil nutrient status and agricultural yields.

Download & links
Nicolette Tamara R. J. M. Jonkman et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 17 Sep 2018)
Status: open (until 17 Sep 2018)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Nicolette Tamara R. J. M. Jonkman et al.
Nicolette Tamara R. J. M. Jonkman et al.
Viewed
Total article views: 86 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
62 21 3 86 7 1 1
  • HTML: 62
  • PDF: 21
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 86
  • Supplement: 7
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 1
Views and downloads (calculated since 06 Aug 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 06 Aug 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)
Total article views: 86 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 85 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited
Saved
No saved metrics found.
Discussed
Latest update: 14 Aug 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
In the urban gardens of Kisumu we interviewed women farmers to determine the sources and scope of their agricultural knowledge. We assessed the impact of their knowledge by comparing the influence of 2 types of management on soil nutrients. While one type of management was more effective in terms of preserving soil nutrients, the other management type had socio-economic benefits. Both environmental and socio-economic impact has to be considered in agricultural training to increase their impact.
In the urban gardens of Kisumu we interviewed women farmers to determine the sources and scope...
Citation
Share