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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2018-12
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2018-12
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Original research article 05 Jun 2018

Original research article | 05 Jun 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal SOIL (SOIL).

Mapping homogeneous spectral response zones in a soil profile

Edward J. Jones and Alex B. McBratney Edward J. Jones and Alex B. McBratney
  • Sydney Institute of Agriculture, Faculty of Science, The University of Sydney

Abstract. Homogeneous spectral response zones represent relatively uniform regions of soil that may be useful for identifying soil horizons or delineating soil units spatially. External parameter orthogonalisation (EPO) and direct standardisation (DS) were assessed for their ability to conserve intrinsic soil information of spectra under variable moisture conditions, as experienced when taking measurements in situ. A 1m×1m section of a soil profile was intensively sampled using visible near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy at 2.5cm vertical intervals and 10cm horizontal intervals. Further samples were taken on a 10cm grid and scanned in a laboratory under field moist and air-dry conditions. A principal component space was constructed based on the in situ scans following either EPO transformation, DS transformation or following pre-processing only (PP). Scores from the first four principal components – which accounted for more than 0.97 of the total variance in each case – were subject to k-means clustering to identify homogeneous spectral response zones. Laboratory-based scans were then projected onto the same principal component space and fitted to the pre-existing cluster centroids. Both EPO and DS were found to have potential in reconciling differences observed between in situ and laboratory-based measurements compared to pre-processing only (PP). EPO outperformed DS in terms of conserving the relationship between PC scores (LCCC: EPO=0.84, DS=0.58, PPO=0.44; RMSE: EPO=11.8, DS=15.4, PPO=38.5) and also in identifying homogeneous spectral response zones that corresponded to field observed horizons.

Edward J. Jones and Alex B. McBratney
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Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Edward J. Jones and Alex B. McBratney
Edward J. Jones and Alex B. McBratney
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Short summary
Variable soil moisture content is one of the main factors limiting field application of visible near-infrared spectroscopy. External parameter orthogonalisation of soil spectra was found to conserve intrinsic soil information under variable moisture conditions. k-means clustering of treated spectra yielded similar classifications under in situ, field moist (laboratory) and air-dried condition. Homogeneous spectral response zones were identified that corresponded with field observed horizons.
Variable soil moisture content is one of the main factors limiting field application of visible...
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