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SOIL An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2016-5
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2016-5
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Short communication 01 Feb 2016

Short communication | 01 Feb 2016

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal SOIL (SOIL). The revised manuscript was not accepted.

Determining the susceptibility of soils materials to erosion by rain-impacted flows

P. I. A. Kinnell P. I. A. Kinnell
  • Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Australia

Abstract. Conceptually, rain has a capacity to cause erosion (rainfall erosivity) and soils have a susceptibility to erosion by rainfall (soil erodibility) but no absolute measure of rainfall erosivity exists. Consequently, soil erodibility is nothing more than an empirical coefficient in the relationship between an index of rainfall erosivity and soil loss. Erosion by rain-impacted flow is influenced by the size, velocity and impact frequency of the raindrops but also flow depth and velocity. Experiments with artificial rainfall falling on sloping surfaces in the field usually do not enable flow depth and velocity to be well measured or controlled. Also, sprays produce artificial rainfall where the spatial uniformity in rainfall intensity, drop size and frequency is often less than desirable. Artificial rainfall produced by pendant drop formers can produce rainfall that has better spatial uniformity. Equipment for controlling flow depth and velocity over eroding surfaces has been developed and used to calibrate the effect of flow depth on the discharge of sediment by rain-impacted flow using artificial rainfall having a uniform drop-size distribution under laboratory conditions. Once calibrated, laboratory experiments can be conducted to rank soils according to their susceptibility to erosion under the flows impacted by the artificial rainfall under conditions where the erosive stress applied to the eroding surface is well controlled.

P. I. A. Kinnell
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
P. I. A. Kinnell
P. I. A. Kinnell
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Short summary
Soils have a susceptibility to being eroded by rainfall which can be determined when the the ability of rain to cause erosion is known and controlled. A laboratory method is described where the important rain and flow factors are well controlled in order to determine the susceptibility of surfaces eroding under flows impacted by raindrops can be assessed.
Soils have a susceptibility to being eroded by rainfall which can be determined when the the...
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