Journal cover Journal topic
SOIL An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  •  value: indexed indexed
  • CiteScore value: 5.79 CiteScore
    5.79
  • SNIP value: 2.052 SNIP 2.052
  • IPP value: 5.30 IPP 5.30
  • SJR value: 1.943 SJR 1.943
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 21 Scimago H
    index 21
  • h5-index value: 22 h5-index 22
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2016-44
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2016-44
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Original research article 01 Aug 2016

Original research article | 01 Aug 2016

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal SOIL (SOIL). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion.

Vertical nutrient and trace element migration in cambisols after application of residues from anaerobic digestion of manure

M. Sager M. Sager
  • Special investigations in element analysis, Institute for Food Safety Vienna, Spargelfeldstrasse 191, A 1220 Vienna, Austria

Abstract. At an alpine grassland cambisol, one site had been intensely fertilized with urban sewage sludge for 10 years of 7.5 tons/ha annually, whereas an adjacent site had been left untreated. A model column experiment was set up to investigate changes of permeabilities and trace element retentions at 0–20 cm and 20–60 cm layers thereof. The particular goal was to monitor losses of nutrients to deeper soil layers or aquifers from biogas residues deposited on site. Residual slurry after biogas production or equivalent amount of water were added on top of the model columns, followed by gradual elution with de-ionized water at amounts of expected rainfall at the sampling site (1000 mm). Long-term sludge treatment changed organic carbon, soil nutrients as well as Ba, Cu, Pb, and Zn significantly, resulting in different vertical migration and elution of applied substances. Differences between the mobilities of P, Fe, S, Cu, B, as well as nitrate and ammonia losses were much more affected by the long-term sludge pretreatment than by the characteristics of the biogas residue or just de-ionized water applied on top of the columns. Largest differences between biogas residue addition and water only were noticed for zinc and ammonia. The addition of iron salts in order to increase sulfide precipitation, had measurable but low effects.

M. Sager
Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
M. Sager
M. Sager
Viewed  
Total article views: 430 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
305 98 27 430 16 27
  • HTML: 305
  • PDF: 98
  • XML: 27
  • Total: 430
  • BibTeX: 16
  • EndNote: 27
Views and downloads (calculated since 01 Aug 2016)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 01 Aug 2016)
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 20 Jul 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Groundwater and well-water composition relies on release and filtering properties of soils and subsoil layers. This paper is about to monitor changes of respective soil properties from long-term sewage-sludge disposal, when a load of manure is applied.
Groundwater and well-water composition relies on release and filtering properties of soils and...
Citation